Carlisle’s edges

“Carlisle’s all about edges, borders, the delineation of one thing and another.

It’s on the edge of England, or maybe the edge of Scotland. It’s a border town, a frontier place, a fringe; the edge of every empire that the last two thousand years has seen. It’s very much the end, the full stop.

It’s the thing between sentences, full of squares and courtyards, the space between places. It’s transient, shifting, always in a state of flux yet ancient, solid. Rooted in Roman history and a local deity, but alive with even more ancient religions. Standing stones, early Christian Celtic crosses in the cathedral, Green Men on the walls of shops in the market square.

The buildings are heavy, made from a local stone that itself changes from one thing to another, sandstone sedimentary layers blending from deep, faded-blood red to a soft yellow, often in one carved piece. Stone from a Roman quarry eight miles away.

The stone is so eccentric it makes the cathedral look like a patchwork. A feeling that’s only enhanced by the slipped lines of decorations, the wonky and skewiff Norman arches, the might of pillars whose feet don’t quite match each other’s ground levels. Maybe the clay, when they built one bay, was wet, (don’t forget, ever, that Carlisle floods), but for whatever reason, stone pillars sank. So even the cathedral is in a state of movement, neither one thing or another. Where there should be something static, unchanging; there’s something that wiggles like a fish.

There are solid stone city walls and metal barricades on Botchergate. Heavy gates across empty alleyways and railings around war memorials. Clear, strong definitions. Black and white. With so much that is transient, temporary, timely, the city tries to draw strong lines.

Of course, a firm line always makes you see what’s either side of it. So the city’s attempts at definition only make the change, confusion and incoherence more apparent.

Carlisle’s about shift and uncertainty, the edge of places, the impermanence of stone.”

Written for an exhibition as part of the Empty Shops Network tour in Carlisle

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One thought on “Carlisle’s edges

  1. I’ve reached and read a variety of your stuff, albeit via a circuitous route, from University of the Arts as a alumni > ICA > to ’empty shops’> your photography> poem ‘Here to You’. You can see my stuff See my profile on http://www.linkedin.com/in/ivpover
    See my photos on http://www.flickr.com/photos/vivipover
    See my last project Switzerland http://web.mac.com/issyvivi/iWeb/www.hanginspace.com/welcome.html
    See my samples of work http://issuu.com/isobelle/docs/ivpover_design_photo_painting
    I’m studying Unravelling Urban Design, Spatial Design etc subjects that relate to my interests. I’m planning on returning to UK end of this year when I’ve competed my Masters. Would love to have talked to you at the ICA, good luck with it. Just thought I’d make a connection. Issy

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